DIVERSITY

Eurosite is Europe's voice for the land conservation community. Through networking, training, advocacy, and campaigning we work passionately to support our members and raise awareness for landscape conservation's power to the public. That way, we help to conserve, restore, manage and steward Europe's nature now and for future generations.

Dr.Tilmann DisselhoffPresident
The successful fight against climate emergency and species extinction implies the acknowledgement of diversity in our society

Europe as a continent and as a political entity is an astonishingly diverse place. Europe’s languages are among the most diverse on the planet, spoken by uncountable peoples deeply connected through an aeon-long common history. Europe covers highly diverse climates from arctic to subtropical environments. It shows beautiful, diverse landscapes that stretch from desert-like landscapes to millennia-old wet bogs, from alpine mountains to coastal wetlands and entire oceans like hardly anywhere else on Earth.
Diversity is the basis of Eurosite’s work. We know from almost 40 years of landscape conservation in Europe: only when acknowledging diversity within humanity, we will understand the power of diversity around us.
But not everyone in Europe understands that. We have political forces that deny human diversity and climate warming. We have one of the highest industrialised agricultural industries globally, which is an adversary to biodiversity. And so are our cities, which are fortunately slowly improving because we finally start to care. Progress is possible, it seems.
With the disastrous loss of insects and the growing death of thirst that our forests are suffering, we experience that change is very much needed in front of our eyes. And we begin to understand that fostering biodiversity is a vital part of our battle against climate emergency.
To win this battle, we have to foster diversity whenever it demands—be it language, gender, peoples or species. We at Eurosite do that because diversity has always been a part of our genes. It comes with our job—naturally.

The power of diversity: making Europe a stronger place for a healthy and safe life of all its inhabitants

As with all ecosystems, everything is connected in one way or the other. If you take out one or more players in a given ecosystem, the chances are high that the system becomes weak. We all know that many habitats in Europe are on the brink of collapse because human activity does precisely this.
Diversity is like gas in chemistry: species will occupy all the space available. Every liveable, little room left in the habitat will be occupied by someone specialised in that particular space. And if no species are fitting that particular space over time, evolution will create someone, as it did with us, the humans. By the way, our species survival in the past was at times a pretty tight squeeze.
Measuring diversity gives us a clue about the state of specific environments. As a rule of thumb, the higher the diversity, the healthier is the habitat in a given environment. From that perspective, European cities tend to be healthier than Europe’s farmlands. Don’t let the agricultural landscape’s green colour fool you. Count the species.
A high diversity of plants makes it harder for an invasive species to capture an environment such as crops in a field. Moreover, biodiversity prevents diseases from causing havoc on our fields. And lastly, a higher diversity in crops helps to secure the food supply. Ireland’s infamous famine caused by blight on potatoes in 1848 was directly caused by a loss of crop diversity. One million people died of hunger, and two million Irish left the country.
The idea that nature brings back diversity to restored habits automatically is, unfortunately, wrong, at least if we think in human-conceivable lapses of time. Even though habitats in the UK have similar counterparts on the continent, there’s a delta in biodiversity between the British Isles and continental Europe. However, not all lost diversity on UK soil will be coming back with a snap of a finger when habitats are restored. But reintroducing extinct species in the UK literally by hand can do the job at times.
We at Eurosite know that landscape conservation can be a tedious job at times that requires enthusiasm, dedication, vast knowledge and lots of support. We love to provide all of that with our working groups, events and campaigning.

Diverse solutions for land conservation

As with all ecosystems, everything is connected in one way or the other. If you take out one or more players in a given ecosystem, the chances are high that the system becomes weak. We all know that many habitats in Europe are on the brink of collapse because human activity does precisely this.
Diversity is like gas in chemistry: species will occupy all the space available. Every liveable, little room left in the habitat will be occupied by someone specialised in that particular space. And if no species are fitting that particular space over time, evolution will create someone, as it did with us, the humans. By the way, our species survival in the past was at times a pretty tight squeeze.
Measuring diversity gives us a clue about the state of specific environments. As a rule of thumb, the higher the diversity, the healthier is the habitat in a given environment. From that perspective, European cities tend to be healthier than Europe’s farmlands. Don’t let the agricultural landscape’s green colour fool you. Count the species.
A high diversity of plants makes it harder for an invasive species to capture an environment such as crops in a field. Moreover, biodiversity prevents diseases from causing havoc on our fields. And lastly, a higher diversity in crops helps to secure the food supply. Ireland’s infamous famine caused by blight on potatoes in 1848 was directly caused by a loss of crop diversity. One million people died of hunger, and two million Irish left the country.
The idea that nature brings back diversity to restored habits automatically is, unfortunately, wrong, at least if we think in human-conceivable lapses of time. Even though habitats in the UK have similar counterparts on the continent, there’s a delta in biodiversity between the British Isles and continental Europe. However, not all lost diversity on UK soil will be coming back with a snap of a finger when habitats are restored. But reintroducing extinct species in the UK literally by hand can do the job at times.
We at Eurosite know that landscape conservation can be a tedious job at times that requires enthusiasm, dedication, vast knowledge and lots of support. We love to provide all of that with our working groups, events and campaigning.

This website is financed by the EU’s LIFE Programme